Connect with us

Environment

‘A lot of babies and bottoms’: Can Vanuatu pull off its decision to ban disposable nappies?

But the news has sparked mixed reactions, with some locals taking to social media to praise the idea while others questioning how it would be implemented. “Vanuatu ahead of the times — well done,” one user wrote on Facebook But cost and accessibility are clearly issues, with another Facebook user voicing concern about the feasibility…

Editor Team

Published

on

‘A lot of babies and bottoms’: Can Vanuatu pull off its decision to ban disposable nappies?

imageBut the news has sparked mixed reactions, with some locals taking to social media to praise the idea while others questioning how it would be implemented.
“Vanuatu ahead of the times — well done,” one user wrote on Facebook
But cost and accessibility are clearly issues, with another Facebook user voicing concern about the feasibility of reusable options in the more remote parts of Vanuatu outside of capital city Port Vila.
“Cloth nappies, waterproofs, T-clamps and nappy liners are very difficult to buy in developing countries,” they wrote.
“Port Vila has some but what about the outer islands?” What fabric best replaces plastic? A race to find alternatives
Belinda Rosselli from local NGO Mama’s Laef said she was working on a prototype reusable nappy.

“I’m trying to work out what fabrics will work best in Vanuatu because of heat,” she said.
Mama’s Laef has successfully produced reusable women’s sanitary products , and while reusable nappies are already widely produced, Ms Roselli is concerned current designs could hurt babies.
“We know that there are babies [being brought forward] across Vanuatu with [navel] issues caused by the synthetic materials used in blankets, [and] the same sort of fabrics are widely used as a liner in reusable diapers,” she said.
“So I’m looking at more cotton-based [fabrics] and other components that will be kind to the baby’s skin.

” Australians use 3.75 million nappies every day Photo: Around 100 used nappies were illegally dumped in Darwin’s rural area (Supplied)
Disposable nappies are a global environmental problem, with an estimated 450 billion used annually.
In Australia, the environmental group Boomerang Alliance has calculated that 3.75 million nappies get used every day of the week.

“That’s a lot of babies, a lot of bottoms, and a lot of nappies,” Jayne Paramor, the alliance’s deputy director, told Pacific Mornings.
“Somewhere around 800 million disposable nappies are going into landfills every year because we don’t have an alternative.”
Ms Paramor said disposable nappies now account for at least one per cent of Australian landfill.
“We’ve been led down a path where we believe disposable is easier, and the environmental consequences are starting to bite,” she said.

Is a nappy ban possible in Australia?
To date, nappy bans have been touted in other parts of world: last year the UK’s Environment Secretary Michael Gove hinted at one ,but was forced to step back on his statement after a community backlash .
Ms Paramor said despite growing concern about plastic pollution, Australia was unlikely to follow Vanuatu’s lead.
“No, I don’t think we are going to see a ban,” she said.
“I think we will first [find] better ways to manage the waste … and keep them out of landfills.

” Did you know that every type of plastic is fully recyclable and that at least 20 per cent of what is in our garbage bins right now should be in our recycle bins?
Ms Paramor said it was important to recognise disposable nappies were once a life-changing tool for women, but better designs are now needed to improve the recyclability of disposable options.
“These days there are fewer and fewer stay-at-home mums, so I think that convenience factor was a huge part of enabling women to go back into the workforce easily and resume their careers,” she said.
“As a woman I would never stand in the way of that benefit, so we need to do a better [job of] designing the material — using and reclaiming and re-utilising them.
“We [should] have the best of both worlds: women [should] have the convenience without necessarily doing things that are of detriment to the planet.

“.

Invests are pleased to have a team of talented correspondents, who are able to bring you quality content on a daily basis. The editorial team cover every industry and have leading market experts from the stock market, ex military journalists, cryptocurrency to health and lifestyle. If it’s important to you it’s important to us and we’ve got the best in the business bringing it to you.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Environment

Climate change may lead oceans to be as acidic as 14 million years ago

Made in NYC Stock quotes by finanzen.net Global warming is making oceans so acidic, they may reach the pH they were 14 million years ago Business Insider Deutschland Aug. 16, 2018, 11:36 AM If we don’t curtail our CO2 emissions soon, our oceans could soon be as acidic as they were 14 million years ago,…

Editor Team

Published

on

Climate change may lead oceans to be as acidic as 14 million years ago

imageMade in NYC Stock quotes by finanzen.net Global warming is making oceans so acidic, they may reach the pH they were 14 million years ago Business Insider Deutschland Aug. 16, 2018, 11:36 AM If we don’t curtail our CO2 emissions soon, our oceans could soon be as acidic as they were 14 million years ago, killing off marine life as we know it. According to a study published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, global warming isn’t the only problem caused by excess CO2 emissions. Our oceans are currently experiencing unprecedented acidification due to rising CO2 levels in the water. If we don’t curb the problem soon, our oceans could soon be as acidic as they were 14 million years ago, killing off marine life as we know it.

We already know plastic waste leads to a colossal level of marine pollution and threatens the lives and habitats of many animals and plants.

We also know sunscreen can bleach coral and destroy whole reefs and that even traces of drugs can tip the hormonal balance of various marine animals. Man is to blame for a large portion of the damage the underwater world has been subjected to, but as if that weren’t bad enough, it turns out we’re causing the ocean another problem, according to a study published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Global warming isn’t the only problem caused by excess CO2 emissions Research conducted by scientists at the University of Cardiff in Wales found that carbon dioxide levels will soon be as high as they were 14 million years ago, when the average temperature on Earth was three degrees Celsius higher. Due to rapid global warming, the pH will have dropped dramatically by 2100. Ocean acidification occurs when the pH of water drops, due to the absorption of CO2 from the atmosphere.

One third of CO2 emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels, which has been ongoing since the beginning of the industrial revolution: 525 billion tons of CO2 have been released into the oceans since that period began. Smoke is seen from a chimney in Altay, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Thomson Reuters The ocean’s pH will soon be as low as it was 14 million years ago The scientists examined the pH value of the water and the CO2 content of the past 22 million years. “Our new geological record of ocean acidification shows us that on our current ‘business as usual’ emission trajectory, oceanic conditions will be unlike marine ecosystems have experienced for the last 14 million years,” said lead author of the study Sindia Sosdian in a statement .

But even the current pH value is alarmingly low: “The current pH is already probably lower than any time in the last 2 million years,” said Carrie Lear, co-author of the study. She added: “Understanding exactly what this means for marine ecosystems requires long-term laboratory and field studies as well as additional observations from the fossil record.” The catastrophic damage to marine life can no longer be averted Though scientists still have to conduct further experiments to establish the precise ramifications this change will entail within the next next few decades, one thing is clear.

If we continue as we have done up until now, the over-acidification will not only kill off existing and future coral reefs entirely; it will cause catastrophic damage to many ecosystems, in which many animals rely on underwater plants for food sources. Read the original article on Business Insider Deutschland . This post originally appeared on Business Insider Deutschland and has been translated from German.

Copyright 2019. Follow Business Insider Deutschland on Twitter ..

Continue Reading

Environment

Single-use plastics banned by EU Parliament – CNN

(CNN) The European Parliament has approved a law banning a wide-range of single-use plastic items, such as straws, cotton buds and cutlery, by 2021. Final implementation of the legislation is expected in the next few weeks. The law, which was supported by 560 Members of the European Parliament against 35 on Wednesday, stipulates that 10…

Editor Team

Published

on

Single-use plastics banned by EU Parliament – CNN

image(CNN) The European Parliament has approved a law banning a wide-range of single-use plastic items, such as straws, cotton buds and cutlery, by 2021.
Final implementation of the legislation is expected in the next few weeks. The law, which was supported by 560 Members of the European Parliament against 35 on Wednesday, stipulates that 10 single-use plastic items will be banned in order to curb ocean pollution. MEPs also agreed a target to collect and recycle 90% of beverage bottles by 2029. “Europe is setting new and ambitious standards, paving the way for the rest of the world,” the European Commission’s first vice-president Frans Timmermans, who is responsible for sustainable development, said in a statement. Read More The new plans come after the EC found that plastics make up more than 80% of marine litter, which has disastrous effects on wildlife and habitats. The EU parliament notes that because of its slow rate of decomposition, plastic residue has been found in marine species as well as fish and shellfish — and therefore also makes its way into the human food chain.

JUST WATCHED Saving our oceans from plastic pollution Replay More Videos … MUST WATCH
Saving our oceans from plastic pollution 04:47 Under the new European law, tobacco companies will be required to cover the costs for the collection of cigarette butts and manufacturers of fishing gear will also have to pay for the retrieval of any plastic nets that have been left at sea. There’s also a new focus on further raising public awareness, where producers of items such as tobacco filters, plastic cups, sanitary towels and wet wipes will be required to clearly explain to users how to appropriately dispose of them.

The European Commission first proposed the ban in May , which was approved by member states in October. Dead whale found with 40 kilograms of plastic bags in its stomach China last year banned the import of 24 varieties of solid waste , including types of plastic and unsorted paper, putting pressure on Europe to deal with its own waste.

The World Economic Forum estimates that there are about 150 million tons of plastic in the world’s seas. A study published in Science in 2015 suggested that between five and 13 million tons more are flowing into them every year. Research shows there will be more plastic than fish by weight in the world’s oceans by 2050, which has spurred policymakers, individuals and companies into action. European nations began phasing out plastic bags more than 15 years ago.

Dozens of other countries and cities have already imposed bans or restrictions on plastic goods, including microbeads, plastic straws and coffee pods..

Continue Reading

Environment

The last straw: European parliament votes to ban single-use plastics | Environment

Vote by MEPs paves way for law to come into force by 2021 across EU. The European parliament has voted to ban single-use plastic cutlery, cotton buds, straws and stirrers as part of a sweeping law against plastic waste that despoils beaches and pollutes oceans. The vote by MEPs paves the way for a ban…

Editor Team

Published

on

The last straw: European parliament votes to ban single-use plastics | Environment

imageVote by MEPs paves way for law to come into force by 2021 across EU. The European parliament has voted to ban single-use plastic cutlery, cotton buds, straws and stirrers as part of a sweeping law against plastic waste that despoils beaches and pollutes oceans.
The vote by MEPs paves the way for a ban on single-use plastics to come into force by 2021 in all EU member states. The UK would have to follow the rules if it took part in and extended the Brexit transition period because of delays in finding a new arrangement with the EU.
The UK environment secretary, Michael Gove, who has previously sparred with the European commission over who is doing the most to cut down plastic pollution , also wants to curb single-use plastics.

As well as targeting the most common plastic beach litter, the directive will ban single-use polystyrene cups and those made from oxo-degradable plastics that disintegrate into tiny fragments.
EU member states will have to introduce measures to reduce the use of plastic food containers and plastic lids for hot drinks. By 2025, plastic bottles should be made of 25% recycled content, and by 2029 90% of them should be recycled.

The EU is also tackling the scourge of wet wipes that help to clog sewers in the form of “fatbergs”. Wet wipes, sanitary towels, tobacco filters and cups will be labelled if they are made with plastic. Packaging will warn consumers of environmental damage they do by disposing of these items incorrectly.
The “polluter pays” principle will be extended to manufacturers of fishing nets so that companies – but not fishing crews – pay the cost of nets lost at sea.

Frans Timmermans, a European commission vice-president, who has spearheaded the plan, said: “Today we have taken an important step to reduce littering and plastic pollution in our oceans and seas. We got this, we can do this.

Europe is setting new and ambitious standards, paving the way for the rest of the world.


At the sitting in Strasbourg, 560 MEPs voted in favour of the recent agreement hammered out with EU ministers, 35 against, with 28 abstentions.

The directive only has to pass through formalities before it is published in the EU rulebook. Once that happens, EU member states will have two years to implement the directive.
Every year, Europeans generate 25m tonnes of plastic waste, but less than 30% is collected for recycling. More than 80% of marine litter is plastic.

Topics Plastics European Union Marine life Oceans Pollution Europe Wildlife news.

Continue Reading

Trending