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House Democrats poised to take the baton from Mueller, move toward impeachment

WASHINGTON — This city is waiting with bated breath for special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on his investigation into the Trump operation’s ties to Russia and possible obstruction of justice by the president and his allies, which is widely expected to land soon. But even without those findings in hand, House Democrats effectively launched the…

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House Democrats poised to take the baton from Mueller, move toward impeachment

WASHINGTON — This city is waiting with bated breath for special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on his investigation into the Trump operation’s ties to Russia and possible obstruction of justice by the president and his allies, which is widely expected to land soon. But even without those findings in hand, House Democrats effectively launched the impeachment process this week.
Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, demanded a ream of documents from Trumpworld ; Rep.

Adam Schiff, D-Calif.

, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, beefed up his staff; and Rep.

Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., a member of the Ways and Means Committee, told NBC his panel would likely ask for Trump’s tax records in the next “two, three weeks.”
The Mueller report won’t be the beginning of the end of the investigation into Trump. Instead, it will be the end of the beginning of a political and legal nightmare that promises to subsume an ever greater portion of his presidency and could, conceivably, lead to his impeachment.
Nadler defends his sweeping investigation into Trump March 5, 2019 03:03 For Trump and his Republican supporters in Congress, the latest moves by Democrats in Congress — which come alongside a New York state investigation into his company’s insurance records, the latest in a long list of state probes of his finances — amount to a partisan push to overturn the results of the 2016 election that could backfire on his adversaries.

“Their intention is impeachment regardless of the facts, and it should be the opposite way,” said Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., the Republican whip in the House. “I think the American people are tired of that kind of harassment of the president.”
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders dismissed Nadler’s new probe as a “fishing expedition” — “a disgraceful and abusive investigation.”
Democratic leaders are trying to carefully shepherd a two-step process that begins with investigations which might or might not lead to impeachment.
Earlier this week, Nadler, Schiff and House Oversight and Reform Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md.

, wrote letters to White House officials explaining that they were expanding their inquiry into the possible destruction of documents relating to Trump’s private meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin because the administration had not responded to a request to turn over relevant records.
The lines of investigation run from Trump’s campaign and White House operations all the way to his tax records and business dealings, and some Democrats are convinced they will ultimately be able to use their findings to tell the story of a president who has committed offenses for which he should be removed from office.
But there’s tremendous friction within their own party over this methodical approach.

Some lawmakers, like freshman Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., have already grown impatient with the pace of the process.
Tlaib said Wednesday that she would introduce a resolution this month calling on the Judiciary Committee to formally begin impeachment proceedings.

Earlier this year, she grabbed headlines when she was caught on camera telling supporters Democrats would “impeach the motherf—er.”
Today, I announced that later this month, I will be introducing a resolution to have the Judiciary Committee move on investigating grounds for impeachment.

Our democracy must be protected. @by_the_ppl @CREDOMobile #accountabilityNow pic.twitter.com/qWXfE6zLmp
— Rashida Tlaib (@RashidaTlaib) March 6, 2019 But many House Democrats aren’t ready to vote to impeach the president. Some don’t believe they’ve seen enough evidence of “high crimes and misdemeanors” — the Constitution’s standard for impeachable offenses — while others say it’s a fool’s errand for the House to pass articles if there aren’t 20 Republican senators ready to help create the two-thirds majority needed to remove Trump from office.
The tension within the caucus is palpable, especially as a crop of newcomers who won in heavily Democratic seats push to take action, while those who helped create the new Democratic majority by winning Republican-held territory are generally more circumspect.

Rep. Anthony Brindisi, a Blue Dog Democrat from upstate New York who is representative of the latter group, said there’s been a noticeable ramping up of impeachment talk on Capitol Hill in recent days.
“It sure feels like it,” he said in an interview Wednesday morning. That concerns him because “it could sidetrack us” from demonstrating to voters that Democrats can move forward with a policy agenda.

“I’m not for impeachment,” he said. “It’s going to be a high bar.”
The investigation piece must be a predicate for impeachment, said Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., who attributed the seemingly sudden shift in urgency to the power Democrats now have in the House. Earlier in the year, they were focused mostly on a fight with Trump over a partial government shutdown and the question of whether Congress would fund his border wall.
Now, though, with the government re-opened and the wall brawl in the hands of federal courts, committee chairmen are starting to get down to investigative business.
What is the Democratic threshold for impeachment? March 5, 2019 04:35 “All questions about the Trump White House have been bottled up for two years,” he said.

“This is an accumulation.”
Trump sees a sprawling “witch hunt” designed to bring him down at any cost.

“Now that they realize the only Collusion with Russia was done by Crooked Hillary Clinton & the Democrats, Nadler, Schiff and the Dem heads of the Committees have gone stone cold CRAZY,” he wrote on Twitter Tuesday. “81 letter[s] sent to innocent people to harass them. They won’t get ANYTHING done for our Country!”
While it’s clear the House has now jumped headlong into what could be a lengthy process for investigating and possibly impeaching the president, senior Democratic lawmakers are still trying to play down the extent to which they are turning up the heat.
“We’re just doing our regular oversight,” said Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.
But with Mueller’s report widely expected to drop shortly, they are also preparing to take up the investigative baton.

Jonathan Allen Jonathan Allen is a Washington-based national political reporter for NBC News who focuses on the presidency..

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Trump Puerto Rico aid: president’s comments about relief funds spark scathing response from island’s governor – CBS News

Puerto Rico governor slams Trump for relief funds comments: “We are your citizens” By Camilo Montoya-Galvez March 27, 2019 / 2:11 PM / CBS News Puerto Rico faces food stamp cuts Puerto Rico’s Gov. Ricardo Rosselló slammed President Trump for opposing further disaster aid to the island and reportedly telling Republican senators he believed the…

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Trump Puerto Rico aid: president’s comments about relief funds spark scathing response from island’s governor – CBS News

Puerto Rico governor slams Trump for relief funds comments: “We are your citizens” By Camilo Montoya-Galvez March 27, 2019 / 2:11 PM / CBS News Puerto Rico faces food stamp cuts
Puerto Rico’s Gov. Ricardo Rosselló slammed President Trump for opposing further disaster aid to the island and reportedly telling Republican senators he believed the U.S. territory received too many federal relief funds compared to states like Texas and Florida, which have also been battered by storms in the past two years.
“The comments attributed to Donald Trump today by senators from his own party are below the dignity of a sitting President of the United States,” Rosselló wrote in a statement. “They continue to lack empathy, are irresponsible, regrettable and, above all, unjustified.”
“Mr. President: Enough with the insults and demeaning mischaracterizations.

We are not your political adversaries; we are your citizens,” the governor added in his most stinging rebuke of the president so far.
Mr. Trump reportedly told Republican senators at a policy lunch Tuesday that federal relief funds sent to Puerto Rico were “way out of proportion to what Texas and Florida and others have gotten,” according to the Associated Press.
In both public and private comments, Mr. Trump has repeatedly expressed opposition to increased disaster aid for Puerto Rico. The island, home to approximately 3.2 million U.S.

citizens, continues to recover from the devastation caused by Hurricane María, which killed nearly 3,000 people — as well as decades of financial instability .
The president’s reported comments and continued opposition to more federal aid to the island will likely precipitate another tense standoff with Congressional Democrats, who now control the House. The Senate will soon vote on a multi-billion dollar disaster assistance package that includes aid for Puerto Rico and states like California, Georgia, North Carolina and Alaska. House Democrats have vowed to reject any measure that does not include funding for the island.
Rebuffing the president’s “disgraceful” comments, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer urged his Republican colleagues to make sure the package guarantees federal relief funds allocated for Puerto Rico are released.

“Help us pass a disaster package that addresses the needs, not of some, but of all disaster survivors; that addresses the needs of all Americans who are affected, not just those that president says come from a state or area that he happens to like,” Schumer said on the Senate floor Wednesday. President @realDonaldTrump is continuing to try to block disaster aid for fellow Americans in Puerto Rico and “doesn’t want another single dollar going to the island.”
These political games must stop.

pic.twitter.com/coChwyXsQg — Chuck Schumer (@SenSchumer) March 27, 2019
The president has repeatedly clashed with Rosselló and other Puerto Rican officials over federal assistance to the U.S. territory. His administration’s handling of recovery efforts in the aftermath of María and Irma have been sharply criticized by some local residents, leaders and most Democrats in Congress.

Recently, Rosselló has denounced the White House for considering diverting disaster relief funds to finance the president’s long-promised wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and opposing $600 million in food assistance funding , which the White House called “excessive and unnecessary.” First published on March 27, 2019 / 2:11 PM © 2019 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Trump just started a new Obamacare fight with Democrats and it could come back to haunt him in 2020

Trump just started a new Obamacare fight with Democrats, and it could come back to haunt him in 2020 Bob Bryan President Donald Trump is reigniting the fight over Obamacare, which may not work in his favour. President Donald Trump declared Tuesday that the GOP would become “The Party of Healthcare!” The pronouncement came the…

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Trump just started a new Obamacare fight with Democrats and it could come back to haunt him in 2020

Trump just started a new Obamacare fight with Democrats, and it could come back to haunt him in 2020 Bob Bryan President Donald Trump is reigniting the fight over Obamacare, which may not work in his favour. President Donald Trump declared Tuesday that the GOP would become “The Party of Healthcare!” The pronouncement came the day after the Trump administration sided with a judge’s ruling that the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare, should be struck down in its entirety. Democrats are embracing the healthcare fight with good reason, as a slew of polling shows Americans dislike Trump’s handling of healthcare and favour Democrats on the issue. If the fight drags into 2020, it could be bad news for Trump and the GOP.
President Donald Trump wants Republicans to go all in on healthcare, but there’s a lot of data showing the president’s new policy focus might not be the best idea for the GOP.
In a tweet on Tuesday, Trump declared that the GOP would reform its image around the healthcare issue.
“The Republican Party will become ‘The Party of Healthcare!’” the president said.
The tweet came the day after the Department of Justice said in a filing that the Trump administration supported a judge’s recent decision that the entirety of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, should be struck down.

If Obamacare is struck down, an estimated 20 million more Americans would go without health insurance, popular provisions like protections for people with preexisting conditions would be gone, and a huge portion of the US healthcare system would be faced with a chaotic scramble to adapt.
Read more: Experts think the ruling that declared Obamacare unconstitutional is ‘insanity in print’ and will likely be overturned
Given the ramifications of the repeal, the Trump administration’s decision to support the decision sent shockwaves through Washington and the healthcare policy world.
“From pre-existing condition protections to premium subsidies to expanded Medicaid to closing the Medicare doughnut hole to breastfeeding breaks to menu labelling,” Larry Levitt, the senior vice president of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan healthcare think thank, tweeted. “Undoing the ACA, as the Trump administration is arguing in court, would affect almost everyone.” Getty Images/Pool Trump is taking another whack at his predecessor’s signature law.
Following the Justice Department decision, Trump kept the focus on healthcare during a meeting with GOP senators on Tuesday.

According to reports , Trump applauded the DOJ move and told Republicans that the party should once again focus on health policy in Congress.

But neither the administration nor Republicans in Congress have drafted a new healthcare plan to replace the ACA.
At the same time, House Democrats rolled out a sweeping bill meant to solidify preexisting-condition protections and strengthen the ACA.
Read more: Trump keeps claiming the GOP will ‘protect people with preexisting conditions.’ But he’s been trying to gut those protections for almost 2 years.
The flurry of activity has brought renewed attention to the healthcare fight, which could pose a serious problem for Trump and become a boon for Democrats.

In fact, here are a few reasons that healthcare in general, and the Obamacare suit specifically, could come back to bite Trump: A majority of Americans now support Obamacare: Polls over the past year have shown Obamacare getting a record level of support, with a majority of Americans on board with the law . The GOP’s previous attempts to replace the ACA were incredibly unpopular: The last time the party attempted to repeal and replace the ACA, every iteration of its replacement was deeply unpopular . So unless there is a substantial change in the party’s approach, a new attempt at replacement is likely to be a political loser. Americans are very concerned about healthcare: Healthcare typically ranks among the most important issues to voters in polling, and the looming possibility of a major upheaval in the healthcare industry could make the issue even more of a factor in 2020.

Healthcare was a winning issue for Democrats in the 2018 midterms: Before the 2018 midterms, Democrats went all in on healthcare messaging.

The party attacked opponents over their support of the GOP repeal-and-replace bills, especially highlighting the replacements’ undermining of protections for people with preexisting conditions . Based on exit polling from that election, the attack worked. Healthcare was the top issue for midterm voters, and a majority of voters trusted Democrats’ ability to handle healthcare changes more than the GOP’s ability.

Additionally, a slew of deep-red states voted to expand Medicaid under the ACA – another piece of the law that the lawsuit would repeal. Americans don’t like Trump’s handling of healthcare: While Americans generally trust Democrats’ handling of healthcare, the same cannot be said for the president. In a November 2018 Gallup poll , only 36% of people said they approved of Trump’s handling of healthcare policy, while 58% disapproved. A Fox News poll published Sunday also showed that just 37% of people approved of Trump’s handling of healthcare versus 52% who did not.

In both of the polls, healthcare was Trump’s weakest issue. The timing of the Obamacare lawsuit could be bad for Trump: Given the timing of the lawsuit, there is a chance that the Supreme Court could decide on the Obamacare repeal in the fall of 2020, just before the presidential election. This means many voters could cast their votes within weeks of hearing that the Trump administration allowed a lawsuit to go forward that would force 20 million Americans to lose coverage while undermining preexisting-condition protections. Business Insider Emails & Alerts
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Poll: Three-Quarters Want Full Mueller Report Made Public : NPR

Enlarge this image Special counsel Robert Mueller after attending church on March 24, 2019, in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Special counsel Robert Mueller after attending church on March 24, 2019, in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Days after Attorney General William Barr released his four-page summary of…

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Poll: Three-Quarters Want Full Mueller Report Made Public : NPR

Enlarge this image Special counsel Robert Mueller after attending church on March 24, 2019, in Washington, D.C. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption
toggle caption Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Special counsel Robert Mueller after attending church on March 24, 2019, in Washington, D.C.
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images Days after Attorney General William Barr released his four-page summary of special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation report, overwhelming majorities of Americans want the full report made public and believe Barr and Mueller should testify before Congress, according to a new NPR/ PBS NewsHour /Marist poll.
Only about a third of Americans believe, from what they’ve seen or heard about the Mueller investigation so far, that President Trump is clear of any wrongdoing. But they are split on how far Democrats should go in investigating him going forward.

“People clearly want to see more about the report,” said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion, which conducted the poll. “They want it released publicly, are eager to see the principals — Mueller and Barr — testify, because they want to see how the sausage was made. They want to see how we got to this point.


At the same time, 56 percent said Mueller conducted a fair investigation, and 51 percent said they were satisfied with it. That included 52 percent of independents who said they were satisfied with the investigation. It’s one of the rare questions in the first two years of the Trump presidency in which a majority of independents sided with Republicans instead of Democrats on a subject.
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The other prominent area where independents have sided with Republicans is on impeachment. An NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll last year found that pushing impeachment would not be a winning issue for Democrats.
The summary “could be somewhat of a blessing in disguise for Democrats,” Miringoff said, “because there’s no massive pressure saying, ‘Look at this report, look at this summary — we have to move forward with impeachment.

‘ ”
Americans: The Barr letter is not enough
Overall, three-quarters said the full Mueller report should be made public. That included a majority of Republicans (54 percent).

Just 18 percent overall said Barr’s summary is enough.
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Two-thirds (66 percent) also said they want Mueller to testify before Congress, and 64 percent said the same for Barr.

Trump not in the clear with the public
Enlarge this image President Trump speaks to supporters during a rally Thursday in Grand Rapids, Mich. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption
toggle caption Scott Olson/Getty Images President Trump speaks to supporters during a rally Thursday in Grand Rapids, Mich.
Scott Olson/Getty Images Almost six in 10 (56 percent) said that questions still exist, with just 36 percent saying Trump is clear of any wrongdoing. That latter figure is close to where Trump’s approval rating has been throughout his presidency.
In this poll, Trump’s approval rating is 42 percent. That’s up slightly (but within the margin of error) from January, when it was 39 percent and unchanged from December.
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But that doesn’t mean the public wants Democrats to go far down the collusion or obstruction-of-justice rabbit hole of investigations.
Politics Trump Takes A Post-Mueller Victory Lap At Michigan Rally On the issue of obstruction, the Mueller report, as summarized by the Barr letter, noted that Mueller did not come to a conclusion on whether charges should be brought against the president. But Mueller said his report did not “exonerate” the president either.

Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein decided against charging the president.

The country was split 48 to 46 percent on whether Barr’s decision not to charge the president should stand or if Congress should continue to investigate obstruction of justice by the president.
Politics Democrats Demand Full Mueller Report, Lay Out Argument For Continued Investigations What’s more, the country was similarly split, 48 to 45 percent, on whether Democrats should hold hearings to further investigate the Mueller report or end their investigations.
“I think they’re on safe footing to want the full report released” and to bring in Barr and Mueller, Miringoff said, adding, “But don’t start saying there’s still collusion, don’t go for obstruction of justice, because then they’re barking up the wrong tree.”
Views of Mueller spike with Republicans
Mueller enjoys an overall positive rating among Americans, with 38 percent favorable, 25 percent unfavorable and roughly a third (37 percent) unsure or never heard of him.

That’s a big change from December, when Mueller was viewed more negatively (33 percent) than positively (29 percent).
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That change is largely due to Republicans viewing him far more favorably now, after Barr’s letter was released. In December, just 8 percent of Republicans viewed him favorably, while 58 percent viewed him negatively. After the Barr letter, the proportion of Republicans viewing Mueller positively jumped to 32 percent.
Politics Bolstered By Mueller Synopsis, Republicans Go On Offense Over Investigations Overall, views of Trump are generally where they have been. In addition to the consistency of his approval rating, about the same percentage of people compared to last July think he did something either illegal or unethical in his dealings with Russian President Vladimir Putin — 57 percent now compared to 53 percent then .

Analysis Impeachment Just Got Less Likely And 6 Other Takeaways From The Barr Letter What’s more, 54 percent of registered voters said they are definitely voting against him in 2020.

That is about where it was in January, when 57 percent of registered said so. And, remember, in the 2016 election, 54 percent of people voted for someone other than Trump.
Of Trump’s standing and the political climate, Miringoff put it this way: “Despite the two years of attention, focused on Russia and the convictions and all that, it pretty much is exactly where it was.”.

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