Connect with us

Politics

Democrats Need to Face the Truth about Ilhan Omar

H ouse speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic-party leadership thought they solved their Ilhan Omar problem one month ago. After the freshman Minnesota congresswoman outraged both Democrats and Republicans with an anti-Semitic tweet about AIPAC buying congressional support with “the Benjamins,” Pelosi acted quickly. She set up a private meeting with Omar, following which the…

Editor Team

Published

on

Democrats Need to Face the Truth about Ilhan Omar

H ouse speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Democratic-party leadership thought they solved their Ilhan Omar problem one month ago. After the freshman Minnesota congresswoman outraged both Democrats and Republicans with an anti-Semitic tweet about AIPAC buying congressional support with “the Benjamins,” Pelosi acted quickly.
She set up a private meeting with Omar, following which the freshman issued a contrite-sounding apology saying that she had no idea that her comments were anti-Semitic. It sounded very much like her 2012 apology over a tweet accusing Israel of “hypnotizing the world,” but the Democrats accepted it — and , in turn, ignored calls from Republicans to strip her of her House Foreign Affairs Committee seat as the GOP had stripped Steve King’s (R., Iowa) committee assignments.
Conservative critics argued that Omar’s anti-Semitism, like that of her fellow House freshman Rashida Tlaib of Michigan (who had accused supporters of Israel of dual loyalty in a tweet), was not so much a matter of ill-considered comments but a product of a worldview. Democrats responded with a deluge of whataboutism. They seized upon every questionable tweet or comment from Republicans that could somehow be interpreted as offensive to Jews, despite the reliably pro-Israel stance of the Trump administration and the lack of evidence that any top Republican is remotely anti-Semitic.

Why the defensiveness? Democrats are loath to discard someone like Omar, who was one of their top feel-good stories coming out of the midterms. Omar was the first Somali American to be elected to Congress and forced the House to change its rules about female head coverings in order to accommodate her Muslim faith. As a woman of color and an immigrant, Omar embodied everything the Democrats believed was the right response to President Trump.
That’s why Democrats quickly moved on from Omar’s “Benjamins” comment. Indeed, Pelosi posed with Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Jahana Hayes for the cover of this month’s issue of Rolling Stone magazine, which featured “The Women Shaping the Future.” While AOC is the rock star of the class of 2018, Pelosi’s embrace of Omar showed that support for BDS would be no bar to coveted committee assignments in a party where identity politics is the priority.

Yet Omar doubled down on anti-Semitic invective the first chance she got.
At a “Progressive Town Hall” held in Washington last week, she claimed that her “Jewish colleagues” were targeting her and representative Rashida Tlaib because “we are Muslim.

” According to Omar, she and Tlaib are both innocent of using anti-Semitic tropes and the victims of religious discrimination by a powerful lobby that uses “Benjamins” to buy off members of Congress, especially Jewish ones:
a lot of our Jewish colleagues, a lot of our constituents, a lot of our allies got to thinking that everything we say about Israel to be anti-Semitic because we are Muslim. . . .

It’s almost as if everything we say regardless of what it is we say . . . we get to be labeled something. Because we end up defending that and nobody ever gets to have the broader debate of what is happening with Palestine.

She also tried out the dual-loyalty canard, adding: “I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is okay to push for allegiance to a foreign country.”
This prompted another bipartisan storm of protest. Far from retreating, Omar doubled down in her response to criticism from Representative Nita Lowey (D.

, N.Y.

), a veteran liberal Jewish Democrat. When Lowey urged her to retract her comments, Omar tweeted, “I should not be expected to have allegiance/pledge support to a foreign country in order to serve my country in Congress or serve on a committee.


Democrats are responding to this with yet another congressional resolution, which will pointedly define anti-Semitism to include the types of comments made by Omar and Tlaib but decline to mention them by name. Nor is there any sign that Pelosi will kick Omar off of the Foreign Affairs Committee, despite the anger of its pro-Israel chairman Representative Eliot Engel (D., N.Y.

) and calls from Republicans and some Jewish groups for more than another meaningless apology.
It’s obvious that Omar and Tlaib have taken the measure of their party’s leadership and decided that they have nothing to fear if they continue with their effort to delegitimize supporters of Israel. These controversies are not rooted in a lack of communication. Since their goal is to legitimize both anti-Zionism and a BDS movement whose aim is Israel’s destruction, they aim to shut down criticism they’ve received for their anti-Semitism and falsely link the defense of Israel with anti-Muslim prejudice.

Omar and Tlaib are probably right not to fear Pelosi’s wrath. They know that support is growing on the left for intersectional libels in which every act of Israeli self-defense against terror is termed a war crime and where self-determination for a Jewish majority is labeled apartheid.

Indeed, despite the furor over the “Benjamins” libel, as a New York Times feature questioning whether AIPAC “is too powerful” indicated, there is an appreciative audience for attacks on the pro-Israel lobby and its supporters in both the liberal press and the Democrats base. AIPAC’s allegedly limitless power — especially when compared with the power of other political and industry lobbies that operate on Capitol Hill — is more myth than reality, and the group’s actual influence is a function of broad support for Israel and Zionism.

But attacks on it remain a good indicator of the persistent appeal of anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories.
At this point, Democrats have a dilemma. If they wish to avoid a creeping Corbynization of their party in which anti-Semitism and anti-Zionism first become tolerated and then accepted, they’ll have to take the kind of action — including taking away Omar’s committee assignments — that can’t be ignored.
But if, due to their fear of offending Omar’s growing legion of fans on the left, they let her off with a slap on the wrist, they will demonstrate that their political narrative in which Trump and the Republicans are depicted as evil while Democrats have clean hands on hate is a partisan fable.

If Omar is still in her seat the next time the Foreign Affairs Committee meets, she could be forgiven for thinking that Rolling Stone’s prediction about the future of the Democrats is prescient.
More from National Review Don’t Accept Omar’s Phony Alibis for Hate Opposing Honors for Angela Davis Isn’t Racist It Was Dishonest to Blame Trump for Anti-Semitism.

Invests are pleased to have a team of talented correspondents, who are able to bring you quality content on a daily basis. The editorial team cover every industry and have leading market experts from the stock market, ex military journalists, cryptocurrency to health and lifestyle. If it’s important to you it’s important to us and we’ve got the best in the business bringing it to you.

Politics

US Senate votes to terminate Trump’s border order

US Senate votes to reject Trump’s emergency declaration, setting up President’s first veto 15 Mar, 2019 7:52am Don’t auto play Never auto play Some Senate Republicans will support a Democratic resolution to terminate the President’s national emergency declaration to build a wall along the US border with Mexico. / CNN Washington Post Share on Reddit…

Editor Team

Published

on

US Senate votes to terminate Trump’s border order

US Senate votes to reject Trump’s emergency declaration, setting up President’s first veto 15 Mar, 2019 7:52am Don’t auto play Never auto play Some Senate Republicans will support a Democratic resolution to terminate the President’s national emergency declaration to build a wall along the US border with Mexico. / CNN Washington Post Share on Reddit reddit In a stunning rebuke, the Republican-controlled Senate has voted to terminate President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency at the US-Mexico border. The disapproval resolution passed the House last month, so the 59-41 Senate vote will send the measure to the Trump’s desk. Trump has promised to use the first veto of his presidency to strike it down, and Congress does not have the votes to override the veto.

But the Senate vote stood as a rare instance of Republicans breaking with Trump in significant numbers on an issue central to his presidency – the construction of a wall along the southern border. Advertisement Advertise with NZME. For weeks Trump had sought to frame the debate in terms of immigration, arguing that Republican senators who supported border security should back him up on the emergency declaration.

But for many GOP lawmakers, it was about a bigger issue: The Constitution itself, which grants Congress – not the president — control over government spending. By declaring a national emergency in order to bypass Congress to get money for his wall, Trump was violating the separation of powers and setting a potentially dangerous precedent, these senators argued. “It’s imperative for the president to honor Congress’ constitutional role,” Senator Rob Portman, said on the Senate floor as he announced his vote in favor of the disapproval resolution. “A national emergency declaration is a tool to be used cautiously and sparingly.” Republicans who voted with Trump and against the disapproval resolution said the president was acting within his authority under the National Emergencies Act, and taking necessary steps to address a humanitarian and drug crisis at the border that Democrats had ignored. “There is a crisis at the border and Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer have prevented a solution,” said Senator Cory Gardner, naming the House speaker and Senate minority leader. “It should never have come to this, but in the absence of congressional action, the President did what Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer refused to do.

” Many GOP senators agonized at length before deciding how to vote, with significant numbers of them – including Portman and Gardner, who is up for re-election next year – waiting until Thursday to announce their positions.

Senator Thom Tillis, another senator up for re-election in a politically divided state, had announced last month that he would vote for the disapproval resolution. He wrote an opinion piece in The Washington Post at the time arguing there would be “no intellectual honesty” in supporting executive overreach by Trump that he had opposed under President Barack Obama. But today Tillis flipped and cast his vote with the President, saying he was reassured by indications that Trump would support changes to the National Emergencies Act itself, to rein in presidential powers going forward. Tillis’ flip-flop highlighted the political pressure Republicans felt over potentially crossing the president. In the end only one Republican who is up for re-election next year Susan Collins, R-Maine, voted for the disapproval resolution. Thursday’s vote followed numerous failed efforts at compromise by vacillating GOP senators, including a dramatic incident Wednesday evening where a trio of GOP senators — Senators Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, and Ben Sasse – showed up nearly unannounced at the White House, interrupting Trump at dinner in a last-ditch effort to craft a compromise.

Their efforts failed, and Graham, Cruz and Sasse all ended up voting against the disapproval resolution. “I said thank you for meeting with us. Sorry we ruined your dinner. And again, if it’d been me, I would have kicked us out after about five minutes,” Graham said later. Ahead of the vote, Trump took to Twitter to goad his critics and insist that defectors would be siding with Pelosi. “A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy Pelosi, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!” Trump wrote. The president said he would support GOP efforts to update the National Emergencies Act at a later date – something that’s been under discussion as a way to rein in presidential powers going forward – “but today’s issue is BORDER SECURITY and Crime!!! Don’t vote with Pelosi!” Pelosi herself told reporters: “The Senate will hopefully vote for the Constitution of the United States to uphold the oath of office that we all take by voting to reject the president’s measure that does violence on the Constitution.

. . . We’ll then send the bill to the president.” Concern among GOP senators has focused on Trump’s use of the National Emergencies Act to grab $3.6 billion appropriated by Congress for military construction projects nationwide – and use it to build barriers along the border instead. Graham declined to specify what exactly was discussed when he and the others showed up to interrupt Trump’s dinner Wednesday night, but said it focused on satisfying those concerns.

The attempted last-minute intervention by Graham and the others was just the latest attempt by Republicans to find some kind of compromise, as they choose between siding with Trump or crossing him on Thursday’s vote. But Trump repeatedly shot down the GOP’s attempts at dealmaking, calling Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, during a private GOP lunch Wednesday to reject a proposal to curtail presidential powers under the National Emergencies Act. Shortly after that, Lee announced he would be voting for the disapproval resolution. The vote on the disapproval resolution came a day after a Senate vote to end US support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen, marking unusual twin rebukes from a Senate that has mostly bowed to Trump’s wishes.

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., offered contrasting takes on the Senate floor Thursday morning about what is at stake. “This is not a normal vote,” Schumer said. “This will be a vote about the very nature of our constitution and the separation of powers.” But McConnell argued that Trump was acting well within his powers and consistently with previous invocations of the National Emergencies Act. “Let’s not lose sight of the particular question that’s before us later today, whether the facts tell us there’s truly a humanitarian and security crisis on our Southern border and whether the Senate, for some reason, feels this particular emergency on our own border does not rise to the other national emergencies current in effect,” McConnell said. – With AP.

Continue Reading

Politics

Border wall: Senate votes to end Donald Trump’s national emergency

WASHINGTON – In a major rebuke to President Donald Trump on his signature domestic policy issue, the Republican-controlled Senate voted Thursday to block the national emergency the president declared to free up money for his border wall. A dozen Republicans joined all Democrats backing a resolution to rescind Trump’s effort to tap into more than…

Editor Team

Published

on

Border wall: Senate votes to end Donald Trump’s national emergency

WASHINGTON – In a major rebuke to President Donald Trump on his signature domestic policy issue, the Republican-controlled Senate voted Thursday to block the national emergency the president declared to free up money for his border wall. A dozen Republicans joined all Democrats backing a resolution to rescind Trump’s effort to tap into more than $6 billion that Congress set aside for other programs, most of them at the Pentagon.
Trump vowed to use his veto power for the first time to kill the resolution, which passed the House last month. There’s probably not enough opposition to override that veto, but the Senate vote was nevertheless a significant political setback for Trump.
The president, who had lobbied hard in recent days to keep Republicans in line, responded with a single-word tweet after the vote.
“VETO!” was all he wrote..

Continue Reading

Politics

Trump faces Senate revolt in vote on border emergency – World News Gateway

Senate Republicans revolt against Trump over border 14 March 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption President Trump says the situation on the southern border constitutes a national crisis Rebel members of President Donald Trump’s party have helped pass a vote to…

Editor Team

Published

on

Trump faces Senate revolt in vote on border emergency – World News Gateway

Senate Republicans revolt against Trump over border 14 March 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption President Trump says the situation on the southern border constitutes a national crisis Rebel members of President Donald Trump’s party have helped pass a vote to reject his declaration of an emergency on the US-Mexico border.
Twelve Republican senators broke party ranks to side with Democrats, approving a proposal to revoke the proclamation by 59-41.
The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives last month backed the measure.
Following Thursday’s vote, Mr Trump tweeted: “VETO!”
Congress needs a two-thirds majority of both chambers to override a presidential veto, which is viewed as unlikely in this case.

Nevertheless, the vote will be seen as an embarrassing loss for the president on his signature domestic issue.
On Twitter, Mr Trump slammed the vote, calling it a “Democrat inspired Resolution which would OPEN BORDERS while increasing Crime, Drugs and Trafficking in our Country”. Skip Twitter post by @realDonaldTrump I look forward to VETOING the just passed Democrat inspired Resolution which would OPEN BORDERS while increasing Crime, Drugs, and Trafficking in our Country. I thank all of the Strong Republicans who voted to support Border Security and our desperately needed WALL! Report End of Twitter post by @realDonaldTrump
It comes just a day after the Senate rebuked him on foreign policy by approving a bill to end US support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen .

The Republican rebels on Thursday were Mitt Romney and Mike Lee of Utah, Marco Rubio of Florida, Roy Blunt of Missouri, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Rob Portman of Ohio, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Rand Paul of Kentucky, and Roger Wicker of Mississippi.
Thom Tillis of North Carolina changed his mind minutes before the vote and said he would oppose it.
The Republican president declared the emergency on 15 February after Congress refused funding for a wall on the US-Mexico border, a key campaign pledge.
He aims to circumvent Congress and build his long-promised barrier by raiding military budgets.

It could free up almost $8bn (£6bn) for the wall, which is still considerably short of the estimated $23bn cost of a barrier along almost 2,000 miles (3,200km) of border, but far more than the nearly $1.4bn begrudgingly allotted last month by Congress. Where authority ends and overreach begins
Gary O’Donoghue, BBC News, Washington
By any standards this is a big rebellion by Republicans in the Senate and therefore a significant embarrassment for the president.
But what it’s not, is a repudiation by them of his border wall policy which many of them support with varying degrees of enthusiasm.

Which begs the question: what were they bothered about?
In straightforward terms, the use of national emergency powers was seen as overreach by the president in two ways:
First, it is a pretty blatant attempt to bypass Congress’s power of the purse – its constitutional right to raise and spend money.
The president had demanded billions for the wall, Congress hadn’t agreed it; the government shutdown; and eventually the White House backed down. So going after the cash by this route was seen as not playing by the rules.
Second, Democrats and some Republicans regard this as a power grab that could set a dangerous precedent.
In the past, a constant refrain from Republicans was that former President Barack Obama regularly abused executive powers to do things he should have won congressional backing for.
And many of the current batch of Republican Senators will be in situ long after President Trump has departed. They might find it harder, if they’d backed the president now, to argue that a future Democratic president couldn’t use emergency powers to, say, move on gun ownership or climate change.
So these rebellious Republicans get to have their cake and eat it.

A marker has been laid down, but, with no chance of a veto override, the president still gets his way.
Or at least for the time being. Ultimately it will be the nine justices of the Supreme Court who will decide where legitimate authority ends and overreach begins.
Earlier on Thursday Mr Trump called Democrats “border deniers” and said any Republican opposing him would be casting “a vote for Nancy Pelosi”.

.

Continue Reading

Trending