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Campaign Finance Overhaul Bill Passes House, But No Senate Vote Planned : NPR

Enlarge this image Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., (center of photo) is the lead author of the For The People Act that passed in the House on Friday. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., (center of photo) is the lead…

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Campaign Finance Overhaul Bill Passes House, But No Senate Vote Planned : NPR

Enlarge this image Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., (center of photo) is the lead author of the For The People Act that passed in the House on Friday. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images hide caption
toggle caption Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc.

via Getty Images Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md., (center of photo) is the lead author of the For The People Act that passed in the House on Friday.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Inc. via Getty Images The House passed an extensive bill Friday that would overhaul the way Americans vote and take aim at the money currently flowing through the U.S. political system.

The bill was dubbed the “For The People Act” by House Democrats who want election accessibility and weeding out corruption to be core tenets of their majority agenda the next two years. The bill passed along straight party lines, 234-193.
Politics Ahead Of 2020 Election, Voting Rights Becomes A Key Issue For Democrats “For months, for years, really for decades, millions of Americans have been looking at Washington and feeling like they’ve been left behind,” said Rep. John Sarbanes, D-Md.

, the lead author of the bill. “Too many Americans have faced this challenge where getting to the ballot box every two years is like getting through an obstacle course.”
House Democrats gathered on the Capitol steps moments before the vote to celebrate the impending passage.
The more than 500-page bill would require all states to offer automatic voter registration, make Election Day a federal holiday, and institute independent redistricting commissions to draw congressional districts as a way to end partisan gerrymandering.

Politics The 2018 Midterms Weren’t Hacked. What Does That Mean For 2020? State election officials have traditionally pushed back on federal efforts to control election administration, and a number of secretaries of state voiced displeasure at an annual meeting earlier this year that House Democrats did not reach out to them in writing the bill.
The bill would also require nonprofit organizations to disclose their large donors, taking aim at the “dark money” currently funding some political campaigns.
The legislation directs the sitting president and vice president, as well as candidates for the presidency and vice presidency, to release their tax returns.

Politics To Deter Foreign Hackers, Some States May Also Be Deterring Voters But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has made it clear he does not plan to give the bill a vote in his chamber, therefore effectively killing it.
Republicans have been calling the bill the “Politician Protection Act” and the “For The Politicians Act” and have specifically called foul on a matching provision in the bill that would heavily subsidize House campaigns that agree to accept small donations only.
Politics House Judiciary Launches Probe Of Allegations Of Obstruction By President Trump “We know this bill is not going to be signed into law,” said Illinois Rep.

Rodney Davis, the ranking Republican on the House subcommittee on elections, on the House floor before the vote. “This bill is nothing but a bill that is for loading billions of billions of dollars into the coffers of members of Congress.


House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., also raised the fact that the bill does not address “ballot harvesting,” or the collecting and returning of vote-by-mail ballots by a third-party.
The practice was used as part of an absentee ballot scheme that resulted in the North Carolina State Board of Elections calling a new election in the state’s 9th District. But many election officials and experts don’t see the collection of mail ballots as an issue in and of itself.
Elections New Election Date Set In North Carolina’s 9th District Following Fraud Investigation Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said Democrats wouldn’t be deterred by Republicans’ unwillingness to take up the bill in the Senate.

“[The bill] restores the people’s faith that government works for the people’s interest, not the special interests,” Pelosi said. “Let us be very clear, this is a fight we are taking a vote on today but it is a fight we will not end until we win it.”
The bill’s passage was a welcome victory for Democrats, who spent much of the week dealing with infighting and disagreement among members over comments by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., that were seen by some as anti-Semitic.

Politics House Votes To Condemn Anti-Semitism After Rep. Omar’s Comments The House passed a resolution Thursday to condemn “anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, racism and other forms of bigotry,” and Pelosi made a point in her comments Friday to specifically thank freshman members for “all the difference they are making for the people.”
Correction March 8, 2019
A previous version of this article incorrectly referred to Rep. Ilhan Omar as a representative of Michigan. She represents Minnesota’s 5th District..

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US Senate votes to terminate Trump’s border order

US Senate votes to reject Trump’s emergency declaration, setting up President’s first veto 15 Mar, 2019 7:52am Don’t auto play Never auto play Some Senate Republicans will support a Democratic resolution to terminate the President’s national emergency declaration to build a wall along the US border with Mexico. / CNN Washington Post Share on Reddit…

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US Senate votes to terminate Trump’s border order

US Senate votes to reject Trump’s emergency declaration, setting up President’s first veto 15 Mar, 2019 7:52am Don’t auto play Never auto play Some Senate Republicans will support a Democratic resolution to terminate the President’s national emergency declaration to build a wall along the US border with Mexico. / CNN Washington Post Share on Reddit reddit In a stunning rebuke, the Republican-controlled Senate has voted to terminate President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency at the US-Mexico border. The disapproval resolution passed the House last month, so the 59-41 Senate vote will send the measure to the Trump’s desk. Trump has promised to use the first veto of his presidency to strike it down, and Congress does not have the votes to override the veto.

But the Senate vote stood as a rare instance of Republicans breaking with Trump in significant numbers on an issue central to his presidency – the construction of a wall along the southern border. Advertisement Advertise with NZME. For weeks Trump had sought to frame the debate in terms of immigration, arguing that Republican senators who supported border security should back him up on the emergency declaration.

But for many GOP lawmakers, it was about a bigger issue: The Constitution itself, which grants Congress – not the president — control over government spending. By declaring a national emergency in order to bypass Congress to get money for his wall, Trump was violating the separation of powers and setting a potentially dangerous precedent, these senators argued. “It’s imperative for the president to honor Congress’ constitutional role,” Senator Rob Portman, said on the Senate floor as he announced his vote in favor of the disapproval resolution. “A national emergency declaration is a tool to be used cautiously and sparingly.” Republicans who voted with Trump and against the disapproval resolution said the president was acting within his authority under the National Emergencies Act, and taking necessary steps to address a humanitarian and drug crisis at the border that Democrats had ignored. “There is a crisis at the border and Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer have prevented a solution,” said Senator Cory Gardner, naming the House speaker and Senate minority leader. “It should never have come to this, but in the absence of congressional action, the President did what Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer refused to do.

” Many GOP senators agonized at length before deciding how to vote, with significant numbers of them – including Portman and Gardner, who is up for re-election next year – waiting until Thursday to announce their positions.

Senator Thom Tillis, another senator up for re-election in a politically divided state, had announced last month that he would vote for the disapproval resolution. He wrote an opinion piece in The Washington Post at the time arguing there would be “no intellectual honesty” in supporting executive overreach by Trump that he had opposed under President Barack Obama. But today Tillis flipped and cast his vote with the President, saying he was reassured by indications that Trump would support changes to the National Emergencies Act itself, to rein in presidential powers going forward. Tillis’ flip-flop highlighted the political pressure Republicans felt over potentially crossing the president. In the end only one Republican who is up for re-election next year Susan Collins, R-Maine, voted for the disapproval resolution. Thursday’s vote followed numerous failed efforts at compromise by vacillating GOP senators, including a dramatic incident Wednesday evening where a trio of GOP senators — Senators Lindsey Graham, Ted Cruz, and Ben Sasse – showed up nearly unannounced at the White House, interrupting Trump at dinner in a last-ditch effort to craft a compromise.

Their efforts failed, and Graham, Cruz and Sasse all ended up voting against the disapproval resolution. “I said thank you for meeting with us. Sorry we ruined your dinner. And again, if it’d been me, I would have kicked us out after about five minutes,” Graham said later. Ahead of the vote, Trump took to Twitter to goad his critics and insist that defectors would be siding with Pelosi. “A vote for today’s resolution by Republican Senators is a vote for Nancy Pelosi, Crime, and the Open Border Democrats!” Trump wrote. The president said he would support GOP efforts to update the National Emergencies Act at a later date – something that’s been under discussion as a way to rein in presidential powers going forward – “but today’s issue is BORDER SECURITY and Crime!!! Don’t vote with Pelosi!” Pelosi herself told reporters: “The Senate will hopefully vote for the Constitution of the United States to uphold the oath of office that we all take by voting to reject the president’s measure that does violence on the Constitution.

. . . We’ll then send the bill to the president.” Concern among GOP senators has focused on Trump’s use of the National Emergencies Act to grab $3.6 billion appropriated by Congress for military construction projects nationwide – and use it to build barriers along the border instead. Graham declined to specify what exactly was discussed when he and the others showed up to interrupt Trump’s dinner Wednesday night, but said it focused on satisfying those concerns.

The attempted last-minute intervention by Graham and the others was just the latest attempt by Republicans to find some kind of compromise, as they choose between siding with Trump or crossing him on Thursday’s vote. But Trump repeatedly shot down the GOP’s attempts at dealmaking, calling Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, during a private GOP lunch Wednesday to reject a proposal to curtail presidential powers under the National Emergencies Act. Shortly after that, Lee announced he would be voting for the disapproval resolution. The vote on the disapproval resolution came a day after a Senate vote to end US support for the Saudi-led war in Yemen, marking unusual twin rebukes from a Senate that has mostly bowed to Trump’s wishes.

Schumer and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., offered contrasting takes on the Senate floor Thursday morning about what is at stake. “This is not a normal vote,” Schumer said. “This will be a vote about the very nature of our constitution and the separation of powers.” But McConnell argued that Trump was acting well within his powers and consistently with previous invocations of the National Emergencies Act. “Let’s not lose sight of the particular question that’s before us later today, whether the facts tell us there’s truly a humanitarian and security crisis on our Southern border and whether the Senate, for some reason, feels this particular emergency on our own border does not rise to the other national emergencies current in effect,” McConnell said. – With AP.

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Border wall: Senate votes to end Donald Trump’s national emergency

WASHINGTON – In a major rebuke to President Donald Trump on his signature domestic policy issue, the Republican-controlled Senate voted Thursday to block the national emergency the president declared to free up money for his border wall. A dozen Republicans joined all Democrats backing a resolution to rescind Trump’s effort to tap into more than…

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Border wall: Senate votes to end Donald Trump’s national emergency

WASHINGTON – In a major rebuke to President Donald Trump on his signature domestic policy issue, the Republican-controlled Senate voted Thursday to block the national emergency the president declared to free up money for his border wall. A dozen Republicans joined all Democrats backing a resolution to rescind Trump’s effort to tap into more than $6 billion that Congress set aside for other programs, most of them at the Pentagon.
Trump vowed to use his veto power for the first time to kill the resolution, which passed the House last month. There’s probably not enough opposition to override that veto, but the Senate vote was nevertheless a significant political setback for Trump.
The president, who had lobbied hard in recent days to keep Republicans in line, responded with a single-word tweet after the vote.
“VETO!” was all he wrote..

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Trump faces Senate revolt in vote on border emergency – World News Gateway

Senate Republicans revolt against Trump over border 14 March 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption President Trump says the situation on the southern border constitutes a national crisis Rebel members of President Donald Trump’s party have helped pass a vote to…

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Trump faces Senate revolt in vote on border emergency – World News Gateway

Senate Republicans revolt against Trump over border 14 March 2019 These are external links and will open in a new window Close share panel Image copyright AFP Image caption President Trump says the situation on the southern border constitutes a national crisis Rebel members of President Donald Trump’s party have helped pass a vote to reject his declaration of an emergency on the US-Mexico border.
Twelve Republican senators broke party ranks to side with Democrats, approving a proposal to revoke the proclamation by 59-41.
The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives last month backed the measure.
Following Thursday’s vote, Mr Trump tweeted: “VETO!”
Congress needs a two-thirds majority of both chambers to override a presidential veto, which is viewed as unlikely in this case.

Nevertheless, the vote will be seen as an embarrassing loss for the president on his signature domestic issue.
On Twitter, Mr Trump slammed the vote, calling it a “Democrat inspired Resolution which would OPEN BORDERS while increasing Crime, Drugs and Trafficking in our Country”. Skip Twitter post by @realDonaldTrump I look forward to VETOING the just passed Democrat inspired Resolution which would OPEN BORDERS while increasing Crime, Drugs, and Trafficking in our Country. I thank all of the Strong Republicans who voted to support Border Security and our desperately needed WALL! Report End of Twitter post by @realDonaldTrump
It comes just a day after the Senate rebuked him on foreign policy by approving a bill to end US support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen .

The Republican rebels on Thursday were Mitt Romney and Mike Lee of Utah, Marco Rubio of Florida, Roy Blunt of Missouri, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania, Rob Portman of Ohio, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Rand Paul of Kentucky, and Roger Wicker of Mississippi.
Thom Tillis of North Carolina changed his mind minutes before the vote and said he would oppose it.
The Republican president declared the emergency on 15 February after Congress refused funding for a wall on the US-Mexico border, a key campaign pledge.
He aims to circumvent Congress and build his long-promised barrier by raiding military budgets.

It could free up almost $8bn (£6bn) for the wall, which is still considerably short of the estimated $23bn cost of a barrier along almost 2,000 miles (3,200km) of border, but far more than the nearly $1.4bn begrudgingly allotted last month by Congress. Where authority ends and overreach begins
Gary O’Donoghue, BBC News, Washington
By any standards this is a big rebellion by Republicans in the Senate and therefore a significant embarrassment for the president.
But what it’s not, is a repudiation by them of his border wall policy which many of them support with varying degrees of enthusiasm.

Which begs the question: what were they bothered about?
In straightforward terms, the use of national emergency powers was seen as overreach by the president in two ways:
First, it is a pretty blatant attempt to bypass Congress’s power of the purse – its constitutional right to raise and spend money.
The president had demanded billions for the wall, Congress hadn’t agreed it; the government shutdown; and eventually the White House backed down. So going after the cash by this route was seen as not playing by the rules.
Second, Democrats and some Republicans regard this as a power grab that could set a dangerous precedent.
In the past, a constant refrain from Republicans was that former President Barack Obama regularly abused executive powers to do things he should have won congressional backing for.
And many of the current batch of Republican Senators will be in situ long after President Trump has departed. They might find it harder, if they’d backed the president now, to argue that a future Democratic president couldn’t use emergency powers to, say, move on gun ownership or climate change.
So these rebellious Republicans get to have their cake and eat it.

A marker has been laid down, but, with no chance of a veto override, the president still gets his way.
Or at least for the time being. Ultimately it will be the nine justices of the Supreme Court who will decide where legitimate authority ends and overreach begins.
Earlier on Thursday Mr Trump called Democrats “border deniers” and said any Republican opposing him would be casting “a vote for Nancy Pelosi”.

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