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Admiral Schofield’s defining moment, through his father’s eyes

The snarl will live on long after Admiral Schofield’s Tennessee basketball career ends. It’s Dec. 9 in Phoenix. Then-No. 7 Tennessee had just upset No. 1 Gonzaga thanks to the heroics of Schofield, who scored 25 of his career-high 30 points in the second half, including a pair of go-ahead threes in the closing moments.…

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Admiral Schofield’s defining moment, through his father’s eyes

image The snarl will live on long after Admiral Schofield’s Tennessee basketball career ends. It’s Dec. 9 in Phoenix. Then-No.

7 Tennessee had just upset No. 1 Gonzaga thanks to the heroics of Schofield, who scored 25 of his career-high 30 points in the second half, including a pair of go-ahead threes in the closing moments. As soon as the horn sounded, Schofield took a direct route to the stands, finding his father, Anthony Schofield , and his older brother, O’Brien , who had made the last-minute decision to make the trip to Talking Stick Resort Arena for the Jerry Colangelo Classic. The pictures caught the moment.

Schofield celebrating with his family. Grant Williams behind him. Lamonte Turner off to the side. Schofield paused, looked back over his shoulder and turned up his nose back toward the court, as if he was already reminiscing about what he had just done to the Zags. For his father, a Navy man who had taught his kids about just how far in life hard work can take you, the moment was one he saw coming. “And the reason for that is,” Anthony Schofield told GoVols247, “to be totally honest, is because he wasn’t recruited like a five-star recruit. He wasn’t highly recruited. He’s always been overlooked, if you will.

I’ve seen it time and time again.” And Anthony offered the same encouragement time and time again while high-level offers eluded his son during a three-star recruitment. “Hey, let’s just keep working at it,” he would tell Admiral. “Your day is coming. Let’s just keep working at it.

Your day is coming because you’re a lot better than these guys. “You just haven’t been in the right place at the right time. Let’s just keep getting after it.

” This was his day. This was his right time and his right place. On national television. Against the No.

1 team in the country. Leading a team that was like him, a roster full of players who were under-recruited and overlooked.

“And when he made those few plays, when he made that shot, and when he came up there,” Anthony said, “that’s all I could reflect on. The point that you’re not being overlooked now.

There’s no way you can be overlooked with what you just accomplished. “For me, if he doesn’t accomplish anything else, that was a very special moment in my life. It kind of gets me choked up every time I talk about it.

” There will likely be more emotion for the Schofield family Tuesday night, when No. 5 Tennessee (26-3, 14-2 SEC) hosts Mississippi State (21-8, 9-7) for a 9 p.m. Eastern Time tipoff (TV: SEC Network) on Senior Night at Thompson-Boling Arena. (Photo: USA TODAY Sports)
The performance against Gonzaga is one of the many moments on Schofield’s winding road in Knoxville, navigating through a coaching change before he ever got on campus, then working his way into a role as one of the most important players in one of the most important eras of Tennessee basketball.

Gator Chomping in Gainesville, jersey-popping during a victory lap in Memphis, celebrating in the stands in Phoenix with his old man and the brother he grew up idolizing. But the story starts with Donnie Tyndall , the one-and-done former Tennessee coach who found Schofield back in 2014, offered him a scholarship and landed his commitment and, ultimately, his signature.

The marriage was short-lived. Schofield committed in August and signed in November. Tyndall was fired the following March, under the black cloud of an NCAA investigation at Southern Miss, his previous school. Just like that, the coach that had discovered him was gone. Rick Barnes was quickly hired to take over the Vols, after parting ways at Texas only days before, and Schofield stuck around, enrolling at Tennessee in June 2015. “I would definitely be wrong if I didn’t give Donnie Tyndall and his staff the utmost respect for seeing something special in Admiral,” Anthony said, “and aggressively recruiting him.” Credit Barnes and his staff for everything that followed, taking an undersized post player and putting him on the wing, transforming his body and making him a constant mismatch — too quick for bigs, too strong for guards.

“Coach Barnes, being selected to come in and head the men’s basketball team and take him, take what he had, the cards that he was dealt with, and turn it into what it is today is truly amazing,” Anthony said.

It didn’t happen overnight, though. And it wasn’t easy. Lean times consumed his first two seasons, as Tennessee piled up 35 losses. Schofield played out of necessity as a freshman, but spent the first half of his sophomore season watching his numbers decline.

But Anthony trusted Barnes and his staff. He trusted the work of strength coach Garrett Medenwald .

He knew what the staff, describing the group as “top-shelf,” was capable of. “I understood exactly what Coach Barnes (was about),” he said. “And it kind of reminded me of myself, to be honest with you. He’s about his business.

And it’s not so much his way or the highway, it’s just that this is how we’re going to do it and I’m going to help you get there. “If you don’t have the mental or physical toughness, then you’re in the wrong place.” When Barnes reflects on Admiral’s career, it begins and ends with work ethic. Coaches don’t want to have to coach hard work.

They can’t, if they’re going to build a winning program. That was never a concern with the versatile big man Barnes inherited. “I do think it’s a talent,” Barnes said on Monday. “Not everybody equally works as hard as everybody else.

” In fact, he added, you can create a depth chart for hard work and you can number it from one to 16. Players know where they stand on that list, from top to bottom. “One thing about Admiral is he has always been at the very top of that list,” Barnes said. “Maybe to a fault, to be quite honest with you, because his idea when things aren’t going well is to do more, more, more and more, and often times I think he’s drained himself mentally and physically.

“I appreciate that because hard work is not a given.” It wasn’t a given in the Schofield family. Anthony inherited it from his parents.

He passed it along to his children with his own twists, given his military career. “I truly believe that what you put in is what you get out of it,” he said. “I’ve always taught my kids — not just Admiral, but his brothers and sister — it’s all about hard work.

At the end of the day, if you haven’t given it your all, and you feel like you left something behind, then you didn’t do your full day’s work. “That’s just something I instilled in them.

They took that onboard and that’s how they all are. I’m very proud of them for that.” Admiral’s hard work surfaced during a breakout junior season that landed him a first-team All-SEC selection and a decision to make during the offseason. He tested the NBA Draft waters but ultimately returned to school, where his senior season has included numbers that continue to climb, pairing with Williams to create one of the best tandems in college basketball.

“He’s certainly never been afraid of putting time in,” Barnes said. “He’s always wanted to try and find ways to improve. I think Grant Williams would tell you that it helped him, knowing that Admiral had to do what he had to on that treadmill to get himself into shape. “Before he could even think about being a better basketball player, he had to get his conditioning right.

” (Photo: John Glaser, USA TODAY Sports)
The two led Tennessee to a 26-9 record last season, a share of the SEC regular-season championship and a No. 3 seed in the NCAA Tournament.

They’ve already matched that win total this season, won a program-record 19 straight games and spent four weeks ranked No. 1. They enter the last week of the regular season chasing another SEC title — tied for first in the standings with LSU — and have a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament within arm’s reach. Without Admiral and his hard work, who knows how much of that becomes reality. “It’s really breathtaking for me,” Anthony said, asked about watching what his son has become.

“I’ve always knew he had the abilities to do a lot of things, and I’m still waiting to see him tap into some of his abilities that he hasn’t tapped into yet. “It has been very special, very amazing to see what see has become, not only as a basketball player but as a very respectable young man.

” Back in Phoenix, in the locker room after Schofield had rallied Tennessee late to stun Gonzaga, Barnes called him up in front of the team, sharing an emotional hug. Barnes told Schofield and the team that, when his game-winning shot went up, a play drawn up to get the ball in his hot hand, Barnes knew it was going in because all he could think of was all the hard work Schofield had put in.

“I just know how hard these guys work and I know what Admiral has done over these past four years,” Barnes said on Monday, reflecting on the moment, “and when a guy can make a tough shot like that and win a big game like that, you do have some emotion for them and some feeling for them.” (Want the latest scoop on Tennessee football and basketball? Make sure you’re in the loop — take five seconds to sign up for our FREE Vols newsletter now!) The next emotion for his father is for what’s ahead. If basketball is Admiral’s future, so be it. Either way, he’s ready. “I’m very excited,” Anthony said.

“Even if it’s not basketball, Tennessee has prepared him for the next level. Just to be out in the workforce. I’m not even overly concerned about that, because I know he can take care of himself.

He’s prepared for that.” If it is basketball, if it is a roster spot in the NBA, it will be another one of those moments, like in the stands in Phoenix, when a father gets a chance to see his son’s hard work pay off.

“If it is basketball, I know he’s prepared for that,” said Anthony. “He’s worked hard for it.

I just hope that he’s blessed to accomplish the dream that he’s been chasing.” Then it would be on to what’s next in line for the family. O’Brien Schofield , Admiral’s older brother, won a Super Bowl with the Seattle Seahawks.

Then Admiral worked his way into a college basketball standout with his NBA dream within reach. “I sit back and think about it and have to kind of kick myself in the backside and say, wow, that’s amazing,” Anthony said. Next up is the youngest Schofield son, General. “Provided Admiral does accomplish his dreams,” Anthony said, “then he has a brother behind him and I have no choice to make sure he makes his.”.

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Termination or resignation: Your labour rights when leaving a job in the UAE

Image Credit: Pexels Despite having clear guidelines on employee rights in the UAE, it is usual for residents to be forced to accept less than what they’re owed in case of resignation or termination. From conditions of notice periods to arbitrary dismissals, there are laws protecting both employee and employer interests. End of contract Resignation…

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Termination or resignation: Your labour rights when leaving a job in the UAE

imageImage Credit: Pexels Despite having clear guidelines on employee rights in the UAE, it is usual for residents to be forced to accept less than what they’re owed in case of resignation or termination.
From conditions of notice periods to arbitrary dismissals, there are laws protecting both employee and employer interests.
End of contract Resignation When you resign, your employer’s acceptance or rejection of your resignation is not essential legally. Even if the resignation was submitted by email, it is considered accepted from the date of submission. Therefore, your contractual notice period (up to a maximum of three months) starts from this date.

Termination Your dues and receivables differ based on whether you are terminated on account of redundancy (cost-cutting) or if you’re terminated in what is considered arbitrary dismissal (wrongful termination).
Also read Revealed: Over 8,000 jobs open in Dubai in one month; industries hiring include real estate, construction, hospitality Career: 7 tips on how women can succeed in a tech job In arbitrary dismissal, employers are liable to compensate the employee for wrongful termination along with gratuity and other dues. In redundancy, there is no such compensation other than gratuity pay and/or notice period compensation.

Your rights and responsibilities Notice period You have to serve notice period when resigning, and this will usually between one month and three months based on your contract. It cannot be more than three months as per law, and your employer cannot force you to work longer than that.
Also read Career: 7 things to know about your notice period in the UAE Your notice period is counted from the day of resignation or termination. In case of termination, the employer might ask you to work during the notice period or pay you the salary for the period before letting you go.

Air fare According to Article 131, your employer is not obligated to pay your air fare to your home country unless it is specified in the labour contract. If it is mentioned, the firm is obligated to all fares as specified by contract.
Also read UAE’s Emirates, flydubai, Air Arabia roll out discounted tickets for flights from Dubai, Sharjah In this case (contractual obligation), however, if the employee enters into the service of another sponsor or employer after, then the latter becomes responsible for air fare from the point of recruitment.

If the termination is by fault of the employee, the employer is not legally liable to pay for air fare if the employee has the means to pay – even if it is mentioned in his or her labour contract.
This law is specific to the cost of a travelling ticket for the employee. Other costs such as shipping or family repatriation are also legally payable if agreed upon in the labour contract or as per contractual company policies.
Visa costs You, as an employee, are never required to reimburse your employer for visa costs at any time. Visa costs and sponsorship costs are the sole responsibility of the employer and regardless of how or why your contract is terminated, you are not legally liable to pay for this.

Companies have been known to ask for installment-based deductions for visa costs from employees – this is illegal and punishable by law.
Experience certificate According to Article 125 of the UAE Labour Law, an employee upon end of contract should be given an end-of-service certificate detailing start date, end date and nature of work performed during the period of employment. It may also state your latest pay or wage details if requested.
An employee can request this certificate upon the end of his or her contract, and the employer would be liable to furnish this, along with any and all certificates belonging to the employee.

Gratuity Pay Payment of gratuity pay depends on how long you have been employed for as well as your contract type.
Guide How to calculate UAE gratuity pay Visa cancellation and passports Charges of visa cancellation and the process are the employer’s responsibility.
Your passport should be handed over to you immediately after the completion of cancellation.
Many employers still force employees to give up their passports for ‘safe-keeping’ or as ‘guarantee’ but this is illegal according to the UAE Labour Law.

Only a competent court or other federal authority is allowed to keep your passport.
Some companies agree to give up passports only close to the time of departure from the country – this is also illegal. At no time is your employer allowed to keep your passport, unless visa renewal or cancellation is in progress.
More From Employment Career:7 tips on how women can succeed in a tech job Suspension with lower pay for more than 10 days illegal What you should know when you start working At what age can you start working in the UAE? Trending UAE gratuity pay calculator Fired or resigning? Here are your labour rights 4 best ways to invest your Dh2,000 in UAE 36 tips to help you leave Dubai rich!.

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19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies – and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices

19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies – and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices Rachel Premack Mar 14, 2019, 09.02 PM Smart-Trucking.com/YouTube Truck drivers who worked for Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, are…

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19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies – and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices

image19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies – and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices Rachel Premack Mar 14, 2019, 09.02 PM Smart-Trucking.com/YouTube Truck drivers who worked for Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, are eligible for a payout of up to $100 million. According to the class action suit, they were misclassified as independent contractors instead of company drivers. It’s the latest win for truck drivers in the nation’s courts .

Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, has agreed to pay up to $100 million to 19,000 former and current truck drivers in a class action suit filed in the United States District Court for the District of Arizona. The truck drivers filed against Swift in Dec. 2009.

They claimed they were misclassified as independent contractors instead of employees, and were thus locked out of certain benefits under federal labor law.
One of those benefits includes being paid minimum wage for every hour that truck drivers work.

Traditionally, truckers are just paid for every mile that they drive. The case returns to a question that’s been plaguing America’s courts in recent years – whether truck drivers deserve minimum wage for nondriving duties.
Swift did not respond to Business Insider’s request for comment.
Dan Getman, a co-lead attorney representing the 19,000 truck drivers involved in the federal case, wrote in a legal statement filed on March 11 that this case challenges Swift’s “owner operator” system.

That allows Swift, and most other trucking companies, to employ truck drivers as independent workers even as they acted as full-time employees.
“(T) heir actions ultimately generated an exceptional $100 million-plus-dollar fund for the class of thousands of drivers and may potentially result in changes to the industry that could benefit all misclassified drivers,” Getman wrote.

Read more: Truck drivers wait an average of 2.5 hours at warehouses without getting paid – here are the 20 cities where truckers wait the longest The decision to pay out speaks to other federal court cases appearing around the country in favor of ensuring truck drivers are paid for every hour they spend on the road.
The Supreme Court ruled in Jan. that contract truck drivers, or owner-operators, at a Missouri trucking company should be allowed to settle disputes in court, rather than arbitration. That suit started when the plaintiff in the case, owner-operator Dominic Oliveira, sued his employer for not paying him minimum wage.

And a federal court in Arkansas decided in a class-action suit in Oct. 2018 that drivers should be paid for every hour truckers spend in their trucks while not sleeping – 16 hours a day of at least minimum-wage pay.
In 2017, a Nebraska court decided that trucking giant Werner Enterprises must pay $780,000 to 52,000 student truck drivers after being accused of pay-practice violations.

Another major carrier, C.R. England, paid $2.35 million in back wages to more than 6,000 drivers in 2016 .

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Labor

19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies — and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices

Smart-Trucking.com/YouTube Some truck drivers who worked for Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, are eligible for part of a total payout of as much as $100 million. The drivers had argued in a class-action suit that they were misclassified as independent contractors instead of company drivers and were thus locked…

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19,000 truck drivers just scored up to $100 million from one of America’s biggest trucking companies — and it’s the latest federal court win by truckers for better labor practices

imageSmart-Trucking.com/YouTube Some truck drivers who worked for Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, are eligible for part of a total payout of as much as $100 million. The drivers had argued in a class-action suit that they were misclassified as independent contractors instead of company drivers and were thus locked out of certain benefits. It’s the latest win for truck drivers in the nation’s courts . Swift Transportation, one of the largest trucking companies in the US, has agreed to pay up to $100 million to 19,000 former and current truck drivers as part of a class-action suit filed in the US District Court for the District of Arizona. The truck drivers filed the suit against Swift in December 2009, arguing that they were misclassified as independent contractors instead of employees and were thus locked out of certain benefits under federal labor law.

One of those benefits is a minimum wage for every hour a truck driver works. Traditionally, truckers are paid for every mile they drive, but a question at the center of court cases in recent years has been whether truck drivers deserve a minimum wage for nondriving duties. Swift did not respond to Business Insider’s request for comment. Dan Getman, an attorney representing the 19,000 truck drivers involved in the federal case, wrote in a legal statement filed on Monday that this case challenged Swift’s “owner-operator” system that allowed it and other trucking companies to employ truck drivers as independent workers even as they acted as full-time employees. “Their actions ultimately generated an exceptional $100 million-plus-dollar fund for the class of thousands of drivers and may potentially result in changes to the industry that could benefit all misclassified drivers,” Getman said. Read more: Truck drivers wait an average of 2.

5 hours at warehouses without getting paid — here are the 20 cities where truckers wait the longest Several other federal court cases around the country have sought to ensure that truck drivers are paid for every hour they spend on the road. The Supreme Court ruled in January that contract truck drivers, or owner-operators, at a Missouri trucking company should be allowed to settle disputes in court, rather than having to enter into arbitration. That suit started when the plaintiff in the case, Dominic Oliveira, sued his employer on charges that it didn’t pay him minimum wage.

In October, a federal court in Arkansas ruled in a class-action suit that drivers should be paid for every hour they spend in their trucks while not sleeping, for up to 16 hours a day of at least minimum-wage pay. In 2017, a Nebraska court decided that Werner Enterprises, a trucking giant that was accused of pay-practice violations, must pay $780,000 to about 52,000 student truck drivers. In 2016, another major carrier, C.R. England, was ordered to pay $2.35 million in back wages to more than 6,000 drivers.

More: BITranspo Trucking Truckers truck drivers Popular .

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